There has been a lot of talk about hurricane Katrina. Much of this has been about the aftermath of it all. In so many instances people are looking for a film that captures the different stories of the people that survived. There have been documentaries about how it happened and why it happened. There have also been movies about what could have been done to prevent it. Desert Bayou tells a different story. This is a documentary, Direct Television packages, that features stars like Master P and educators like Dr. Beverly Knight. It a look at at the story of African Americans that were transported from the urban New Orleans area to an mostly white area in Utah. This story is much different from many of the others that exist. People really would have to see it to believe it. This is an enlightening story of the aftermath of one of the deadliest natural disasters that have even hit the United States. Some people still have not bounced back form the devastation. It has become something that makes people sit back and wonder why there were not more measures taken. It also makes people wonder why New Orleans natives would be obscurely misplaced.

Desert Bayou is a tender moving that touches on the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. Behind the scenes of the movie you will find the director Alex LeMay working hard to portray what really happened that fateful day. LeMay lets the people tell their story in their own way. The movie was released in October 2007. The movie also portrays what its like to be in the middle of a disaster and how it can change continue reading…

I’ve seen my share of documentaries. I think anyone who has a television provider like www.Cable-TV.com/, has had access to their fair share of these, but every once and a while one comes out that really raises the bar and distinguishes itself from the rest.

That one, for me, happens to be Desert Bayou.

The film follows the plight of several hundred African Americans after they are airlifted from the devastation and destruction into the state of Utah. From there it’s a heartbreaking, bleak and often-times tragic account of their lives post-Katrina.

While the devastation of one of the worst natural disasters in human history takes center stage, the real focus is on the underlying issues of racism and segregation that are still prevalent in our “civilized” society to this day.

The documentary pulls no punches in its portrayal of the suffering caused by the aftermath, but the real draw to the film is how the disaster seems to bring out the worst in people.

In the United States, we like to think that disasters bring out the best in us. We clothe our neighbors and give fallen men our hands – but that’s not really how it is and, if Desert Bayou proves anything, it’s exactly the opposite. Disaster brings out the worst.

Desert Bayou (2007) is a touching post-Katrina documentary by prominent filmmaker Alex LeMay that tells the story of African Americans who were being transported from New Orleans to an abandoned military base in the desert without their knowledge. The desert, located 45 miles from Salt Lake City, is a completely unfamiliar environment to the New Orleans residents but it is from there that they struggle to rebuild their lives. The movie offers a unique take on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. It follows continue reading…

The film, Desert Bayou, is a documentary that was directed by Alex LeMay. The storyline of the film is actual events that occurred after the horrific Hurricane Katrina incident. Hurricane Katrina had destroyed much of New Orleans, leaving behind a heartbreaking scene. Desert Bayou focuses on sharing the story and the experiences of the African-Americans who were lucky enough to survive the killer hurricane.

Those African-Americans who survived Hurricane Katrina did not get much peace and relaxation after continue reading…

Desert Bayou is a documentary that tells the story of 600 African Americans that were airlifted from New Orleans during the aftermath of Katrina. The rescued group were taken to Utah and then given shelter at an old military base. The documentary discusses issues that were an intricate part of the event, such as the lack of government support from the view of the refugees, poverty, religion, and racial issues. The film Desert Bayou is another well documented reminder of continue reading…

Desert Bayou is a documentary covering the evacuation of 600 African Americans to the Utah desert after the horrors of Hurricane Katrina. Without prior notice, they are wrenched from their lives by a natural disaster of monstrous proportions and forced to go to a place where there is a major culture clash between the mostly white residents of Utah and the people devastated in Louisiana. The title is inspired from the Bayou of New Orleans and being transplanted to the desert where many people are close-minded, expecting the worst from these refugees.Confused? Here‘s a little help . The people were brought to a National Guard base and eventually relocated to temporary residences. They were treated as suspects, forced to obey a curfew, and definitely not given the warm welcome they deserved after enduring such hardship. The film is a reality check for anyone who watches and thinks that prejudice is dead. When a group of African Americans find themselves in a completely unfamiliar place, they have few allies or people that will even give them a chance when they should have been treated with compassion. They must have felt like they were trapped in a desert of the soul. At least they had each other.

There has been a lot of talk about hurricane Katrina. Much of this has been about the aftermath of it all. In so many instances people are looking for a film that captures the different stories of the people that survived. There have been documentaries about how it happened and why it happened. There have also been movies about what could have been done to prevent it.

Desert Bayou tells a different story. This is a documentary that features stars like Master P and educators like Dr. Beverly Knight. It a continue reading…